National Microchipping Month

This month is National Microchipping Month sponsored by Petlog.

New statistics were released at the end of May by The Kennel Club; the research, carried out by the UK’s largest lost and found database for microchipped pets: Petlog. Petlog state that 46% of dog owners are unaware that compulsory microchipping is to be made in England while, out of the other 54% only one in five knew it was compulsory in England by 2016. At the same time just less than 50% of pet owners do not know if their details are currently up to date.

Isn’t this slightly worrying? There is truly a lack of understanding with dog owners around the country, almost all major charities think that microchipping is beneficial and rightly so. Such a simple and cheap procedure can be a brilliant method to safeguard your pet in case they go missing.

Size comparison of the chip.
Size comparison of the chip.

However, microchipping your pet is only half the job, making sure they are updated is almost as important. In my experience people often assume that changing the details would somehow require a new microchip plant but fortunately that isn’t the case. Updating your details are very simple; simply access the database website you’ve originally registered with (Petlog, PETtrac, Anibase etc.)  and amend the details, it can also be done with some vets too.

As it stands in the UK, the Control of Dogs Order 1992 states that any dog in a public place must wear a collar with the name and address (including postcode) details such as the owner  and telephone number is recommended. So far it’s worked very well, there are very few dogs I’ve come across (if any) that haven’t got a tag which is great. Owners need to be reminded that the relevant and up to date details are engraved on. Microchipping will soon be an additional requirement by law and hopefully it will be hugely beneficial. However until then, it’s absolutely essential that people are aware how important microchipping is, considering that 53% of dogs that stay last year unfortunately were unable to reunite with their owners. I wonder how many dogs weren’t able to reunite their owners due to lack of tag or microchip on the dog, and if they do the information has to be up to date. Otherwise what’s the point in having a tag or microchip in the first place?

Another statistic from Petlog I found mildly amusing was that 12% of pet owners think that microchipping is some sort of GPS system. It’s important to understand exactly how microchipping works and more importantly, how beneficial it can be. Sadly people will only truly understand how important it is once their dog is missing. Thanks to microchipping, thousands of missing dogs have been reunited with their owners and lets hope these figures continue to grow.

More information by The Kennel Club Press Release here.

Want to find out more about National Microchipping Month and how to microchip your pet? Visit www.petlog.org.uk/national-microchipping-month-2013 


6 thoughts on “National Microchipping Month

  1. Since most lost dogs end up in shelters where they are either adopted or euthanized, it’s incredibly important to microchip your dog in order to prevent this from happening to your dog and to make it easier for you to be reunited with your dog should you ever become separated.

  2. The fastest reunions happen when a pet is wearing visible external identification, but there’s more to ID than just tags. Nowadays, identifying information can be found stitched directly into embroidered collars , rolled inside metal ID capsules , voice-recorded on talking pet tags, and in the case of some animals, tattooed on the ears, belly, or inner thigh. If the pet is carrying a phone number or address for its owners, your search may be over that quickly.

  3. Microchipping is a great tool to help reunite lost pets with their owners. We highly recommend that all dogs and cats get microchipped, as there is no telling when they could become separated from their families. Most every veterinary hospital, shelter, and police department have a scanner, so when they are presented with a lost pet they can read the microchip, contact the microchip company which has the owner’s information on file, so they can be called and the pet returned.

  4. The fastest reunions happen when a pet is wearing visible external identification, but there’s more to ID than just tags. Nowadays, identifying information can be found stitched directly into embroidered collars , rolled inside metal ID capsules , voice-recorded on talking pet tags, and in the case of some animals, tattooed on the ears, belly, or inner thigh. If the pet is carrying a phone number or address for its owners, your search may be over that quickly.

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  6. One time, Moxy managed to find his way out of the yard after a deliveryman left the gate open. His owners scrambled into pet detective mode and drove around the neighborhood all night looking for him. Finally, after three days of hand-wringing and putting up “lost dog” signs, the county shelter called to say that they had Moxy.

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