The Kennel Clubs response to ‘Compulsory Microchipping’

kennel-club-logoThis was one response I was really looking forward to; I asked The Kennel Club who manage Petlog their opinions on microchipping. Petlog is the largest microchipping database in the UK. They also have an important role in consulting with groups such as Defra and The Microchipping Aliance.

For those who haven’t seen my previous articles, you can find them here;

Compulsory Microchipping: Your Views (Part 1)

Compulsory Microchipping: Your Views (Part 2)

The Kennel Club has kindly not only given us an official statement but responded to some of the comments which you guys have been leaving.

This is what they wrote;

‘The Kennel Club has campaigned as part of the Microchipping Alliance to make permanent identification compulsory for all dogs since 2009. The Microchipping Alliance comprises a number of animal welfare charities, assistance dog charities, veterinary organisations, dog membership organisations, and other organisations affected by dog issues, and has welcomed the Government’s long-awaited announcement.

The Kennel Club and the Alliance believe the introduction of a requirement to permanently identify a dog through compulsory microchipping will go a long way towards improving the current situation surrounding stray dogs by reducing the need for unidentified lost dogs to be rehomed.

The legislation will not only help reunite dogs with their owners more quickly and easily, but it will also reduce the burden on animal welfare organisations, local councils and dog wardens and save money.

Local authorities and welfare charities spend some £57 million a year on kennelling costs.

Over 100,000 dogs either stray, become lost or are stolen each year, with many having to be kept in kennels before being re-homed. Local authorities and welfare charities spend some £57 million a year on kennelling costs. From a welfare perspective, improved reunification will mean that fewer dogs have to be destroyed. Some 6,000 dogs have to be put down each year because their owner cannot be found.

Compulsory microchipping was not a decision plucked out of nowhere – the Westminster government’s announcement, alongside a package of measures tackle welfare and irresponsible dog ownership, followed a lengthy consultation process dating as far back as the previous government.

I would like to discuss Graham Inman’s point (seen here) that animal welfare should be the primary design behind the legislation.

of all of the 23 countries included within the study, almost all reported a significant drop in the number of stray dogs once this had been introduced.

The Kennel Club, other members of the Microchip Alliance and Defra also believe this, and research from other countries that have introduced compulsory microchipping has provided reassuring results. In Sweden for example, where it is a legal requirement for dogs to be registered and permanently identified from four months of age, over 90% of stray dogs are reunited with their owners within 24 hours of being collected by the authorities. In fact, of all of the 23 countries included within the study, almost all reported a significant drop in the number of stray dogs once this had been introduced.

In regards to the monetisation, research by the Microchip Alliance estimated that the annual cost saving to local authorities could be in excess of £20 million. The cost to implement the legislation will also be minimal, with many local authorities already in possession of scanners and the Kennel Club having pledged to provide an extra 300 scanners for local authorities.

In Sweden for example, where it is a legal requirement for dogs to be registered and permanently identified from four months of age, over 90% of stray dogs are reunited with their owners within 24 hours of being collected by the authorities

 Dog charities such as Battersea, Blue Cross and Dogs Trust have also committed to providing free microchipping to help dog owners comply with the legislation, with Dogs Trust also pledging a donation of two million microchips to any skilled implanter agreeing to implant them for free. Compulsory microchipping is not a tax on dog owners – it is a responsible step that will give all dog owners peace of mind that their dog can be returned to them when lost, whilst also helping to reduce the time lost dogs stay with local authorities and welfare charities.

The traceability of microchipping could also serve numerous other benefits, including helping to reduce puppy farming by providing the ability to trace sick puppies back to their breeders.

The government will introduce regulations to require the microchipping of all dogs in England from 6 April 2016.

This year, The Kennel Club hosted a microchipping debate at the House of Commons during National Microchipping Month

From that date owners will need to have their dog microchipped and registered on one of the authorised commercial databases available; and they will have to register the details of any new owner before they sell or give the dog away. Owners will be required to keep their contact details up to date on the microchip databases.

Defra is now working with database providers and microchip suppliers to ensure minimum standards of service for commercial databases and standards of microchips, and to ensure that there is updated implantation guidance and training available, as well as a one-stop 24 hour enquiry point for microchipped lost and found dogs.

The Kennel Club has always been dedicated to reuniting dog and owner through Petlog, and holds National Microchipping Month each June to educate those involved with dogs on the benefits of microchipping. This year, The Kennel Club hosted a microchipping debate at the House of Commons during National Microchipping Month which was attended by the Minister tasked with managing the compulsory microchipping portfolio, Lord de Mauley. The briefing, which was attended by a range of stakeholders, provided Defra with significant insight into the successful implementation of the legislation.

The Kennel Club manages Petlog, the UK’s largest lost and found database for microchipped pets, which was established to help reunite lost dogs with their owners. As such it is delighted that microchipping will soon be mandatory for all dogs, helping to promote animal welfare and responsible dog ownership and bring dogs and owners back together more quickly and effectively.

We will continue working with Defra regarding the specifics of the regulations but remain confident that compulsory microchipping will be a positive step forward for the good of dog welfare.

The Microchip Alliance briefing can be found here: http://www.bva.co.uk/public/documents/compulsory_microchipping_briefing.pdf.’

So what do you guys think? Let us know by commenting below or sending me an email on mark@walden.me

Thanks for reading!


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