Monthly Archives: August 2014

Microchips – Small Chips to Consider…

Compulsory Microchipping is fast approaching the UK; as of March 2015 it will be compulsory in Wales while England will have to wait until April 2016, but is microchipping a solution in itself? As usual the proposed legislation is vague, dull and drawn out and there are various things to consider.

chippingAs much as I advocate microchipping across all dogs in the UK, I’m always slightly cautious when the government finds a need to add legislation to ensure owners do the right thing. I personally see it as common sense, and I hope most owners also see this – perhaps some might not find this obvious thus the need for this?

As mentioned on my previous article on microchipping I would rather not tell owners that they will be fined £500 for not microchipping their dog, instead I would tell them that if they choose not to microchip their dog they are dramatically increasing the chances of losing them if they run away.

Above all this is a welfare issue and thousands of dogs across the UK and indeed the world have been reunited with their owners as a result of this.

What is a ‘microchip’ you might say? To many, it is often regarded as a GPS navigation system or a high-tech disk that monitors  your dogs thoughts and feelings.

Sadly not…

Quite simply, it’s a rice-grain sized identification tag that cannot be taken off. If someone has a scanner the details will come up in a database with the owners address and contact details. A quick phone call, email or visit and your dog is reunited with the owner.  A textbook result.

Fitting a microchip onto your dog is the first step, other ‘chips’ to consider include;

A microchip is roughly the size of a grain of rice

Make sure you keep your contact details up to date online such as your full name, home address, telephone number and your email address. This can be easily done online or by your local vet.

A microchip is roughly the size of a grain of rice

When visiting your vet annually always make sure that they are able to detect the microchip with a simple scan. On rare occasions microchips can ‘migrate‘ to other parts of the body, this can cause problems identifying the dog if found by a local dog warden or vet.

A microchip is roughly the size of a grain of rice

Microchips can break or malfunction on rare occasions. If the vet cannot find a microchip on your dog, this could be a result it.

This may sound complicated to some but all of this can be solved by asking your local vet on your annual visit. Ask to check the details are up to date and the vet can scan your dog, in most cases they will do this for free and it literally takes less than 5 minutes to do if no problems are found.

Happy chipping and scanning dog owners!